Friday, February 5, 2016

GM Alex Lenderman Lecture and Simul - Sat Feb 6

Chess Grand Master Alex Lenderman Simultaneous Exhibition at West Haven Police Department on Saturday February 6 GM Alex Lenderman is having a simul at the West Haven Police Department on Saturday Feb. 6.
FIDE Grandmaster since 2009 (currently rated 2700+) || • Currently ranked 7th strongest player in the USA || • Winner 2014 Open International Bavarian Chess Championship || • Gold Medal 2nd Board for Team USA at 2015 World Team Chess Championship || • Winner 2015 World Open || • Contributor of instructional videos for Chess.com || || || WHEN: Saturday, February 6, 2016 at 10:00 AM || WHERE: West Haven Police Dept, West Haven, CT || WHO: ANYONE WHO LOVES CHESS || ENTRY FEE: $30 Per Person – includes pizza, snacks & beverages || Registration: Please contact Al Pinto no later than February 1, 2016 || at scoots66@gmail.com to register. || Payments will be received via PayPal or credit card. || Sponsored By West Haven Renegade Knights Chess Club West Haven Police Department || Connecticut Chess Magazine (CCM) now has 4,000 members in its Facebook Group, and 3,270 like its Facebook Page. || So far the ConnecticutChess@blogspot.com has accrued 66,300+ visits. || 94 chess players automatically get CCM via email: Subscribe to Connecticut Chess Magazine by Email || 154 chess players follow Rob Roy on Twitter. On Google+ we have 102 chess players who have CCM in their circles. || We promote all chess activity in the state of Connecticut. send publicity and reports to Rob Roy at ConnecticutChess@gmail.com USCF tournament in Coventry Connecticut on May 1, Sunday ||

Super Chess SuperBowl Weekend

Sat Feb 6 at 10 am. GM Alex Lenderman Lecture and Simul || West Haven Police Dept., click here for details || Sun Feb 7 at 9 am. Greater New Haven Open || Savin Rock Conference Center, West Haven Connecticut || click here for details || || Connecticut Chess Magazine (CCM) now has 4,000 members in its Facebook Group, and 3,270 like its Facebook Page. || So far the ConnecticutChess@blogspot.com has accrued 66,300+ visits. || 94 chess players automatically get CCM via email: Subscribe to Connecticut Chess Magazine by Email || 154 chess players follow Rob Roy on Twitter. On Google+ we have 102 chess players who have CCM in their circles. || We promote all chess activity in the state of Connecticut. send publicity and reports to Rob Roy at ConnecticutChess@gmail.com USCF tournament in Coventry Connecticut on May 1, Sunday ||

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Connecticut Chess Magazine offers free Classified Ads

Chess Collectibles are up available for sale on the new "Chess Classifieds" sub-page of Connecticut Chess Magazine || Seen on: Google Sites Blogger Google+ Facebook Twitter Tripod Hundreds of chess players read Connecticut Chess Magazine || FREE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR ALL CHESSPLAYERS RESIDING IN CONNECTICUT, MASSACHUSETTS, NEW YORK, RHODE ISLAND, VERMONT, NEW HAMPSHIRE, AND MAINE. || SEND LISTING (description, price, contact, and photo) to => CONNECTICUTCHESS@GMAIL.COM

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Chess Center Grand Opening Tournament - Sunday May 1

USCF-Rated One-Day Event || Sunday May 1, 2016 || CHESS CENTER GRAND OPENING TOURNAMENT || 3-SS in 8-man sections by rating || Time Control: G/90 d5. Entry Fee: $60 cash only at site || Cash Prizes: $240-$80 per 8-man section || Tournament Location: Chess Center, 3111 South St., Coventry Connecticut 06238 || Registration 10-10:45am Rd 1 - 11am, Rds 2-3 as completed || Advance Entry Fee: Pay 1 week in advance to get $20 off (mail by Apr 23) $40 check payable to Rob Roy, mail to 3111 South St., Coventry CT 06238 Pay online via PayPal || Email: ConnecticutChess@gmail.com Telephone: (860) 887-5052 || CLICK HERE FOR TOURNAMENT DETAILS - CLICK HERE FOR MAP AND DRIVING DIRECTIONS - CLICK HERE FOR NEARBY CONVENIENCES || Free Internet Free Refreshments No Smoking || Video of new chess center

Saturday, January 16, 2016

This week’s game is merely the source for computer inspiration

This week’s game is merely the source for computer inspiration. As a human, I glimpsed it in the notes, and took it from there. In a game/10 full of mistakes at the Rosendale NY Chess Club, the last blunder was mine, and the computer’s suggested alternative leads to an ending that has never appeared in my games before, one side has four pieces and no pawns, the other side has three pieces and two pawns. In a time scramble I would prefer the side with the two knights, it will be all the opponent can do not to walk into a fork. I suppose the real winning chances are with the two white pawns, but can anything actually be accomplished before the 50 move rule sets in? I turned this hypothetical mind-blower over to Stockfish. || || Set up this position on a chess board: White starts with the king on g1, rooks on f1 and a7, a knight on d6, a bishop on d2 and pawns on b2, b3, g2, and h3. Black starts with the king on g8, a rook on b7, bishops on g7 and g6, knights on e7 and c6, and pawns on b7 and h6. [Event "game/10"] [Site "Rosendale Chess Club"] [Date "2016.01.13"] [White "Alan Lasser"] [Black "Chris Lamerson"] [Result "0-1"] [FEN "1r4k1/Rp2n1b1/2nN2bp/8/8/1P5P/1P1B2P1/5RK1 w - - 0 1"] [SetUp "1"] 1.Rxb7 Rxb7 2.Nxb7 Bxb2 $6 { +0.89/20 } ( 2...Nf5 { +0.57/21 } 3.Bc3 Ncd4 4.Re1 Ng3 5.Nc5 Nge2+ 6.Kh2 Bf7 7.Bd2 Be5+ 8.Kh1 h5 9.b4 Bc4 10.Ne4 Kg7 11.Ra1 Nb5 12.Ra6 Bxb2 13.Rh6 Bf7 ) 3.Nc5 $4 { -2.23/20 } ( 3.Bxh6 Bc2 4.Kh1 Bd4 5.Nd6 Bxb3 6.h4 Kh7 7.Bd2 Kg6 { It's HIARCS analysis to here, the rest is Stockfish } 8.Rf3 Bd5 9.Rg3+ Kf6 10.Rg4 Ke6 11.Nb5 Be5 12.h5 Kf7 13.Nc3 Be6 14.Rg5 Bf5 15.Nd5 Ke6 16.Nxe7 Nxe7 17.h6 Nd5 18.g4 Be4+ 19.Kg1 Nf4 20.Rg8 Kf7 21.Rc8 Bd4+ 22.Kf1 Bd3+ 23.Ke1 Ne6 24.Bc1 Be4 25.Ke2 Kg6 26.Rb8 Bc6 27.Kd3 Bf3 28.g5 Bd5 29.Rg8+ Bg7 30.Re8 { It's only a draw after 30.hg Nf4 31.Bf4 Bg8 } 30...Be5 31.Re7 Nc5+ 32.Kc2 Ne6 33.Be3 Bh8 34.Kd2 Nxg5 35.Bxg5 Kxg5 36.Re8 Kxh6 37.Rxh8+ { Now it's a tablebase draw. This may be a result of the HIARCS start. Stockfish prefers 4.Bg5 Bd4 5.Kh2 Bb3 6.Na5 Na5 7.Be7 Be6 8.Bd6 Nc4 9.Bf4 Nb6 10.Rd1 Bf2 11.g4 Nd5 12.Bg3 Bc5 13.Re1 Kf7 14.Be5 Be7 15.Kg3 Nf6 16.Rf1 Kg6 17.Bf6 Bf6 18.Re1 Bd5 19.h4 Bc3 20.Re8 Kf6 21.Rf8 Kg7 22.Rf1 Be5 23.Kh3 Be6 24.h5 Bf6 25.Rb1 Bg5 26.Kg3 Kf6 27.Rd1 +0.44 but Black's blockade appears to be successful in this position. This would be contrary to the conclusion of the 2003 version of Basic Chess Endings which was written without computer insight and says "Rook plus two pawns always win." } 3...Bd4+ 0-1 || The Tata Steel Tournament starts this morning at www.tatasteelchess.com || || || Connecticut Chess Magazine (CCM) now has 4,000 members in its Facebook Group, and 3,270 like its Facebook Page. || So far the ConnecticutChess@blogspot.com has accrued 66,300+ visits. || 94 chess players automatically get CCM via email: Subscribe to Connecticut Chess Magazine by Email || 154 chess players follow Rob Roy on Twitter. On Google+ we have 102 chess players who have CCM in their circles. || We promote all chess activity in the state of Connecticut. send publicity and reports to Rob Roy at ConnecticutChess@gmail.com Connecticut Chess Magazine also has a web page || We forward Alan Lasser's Game Of The Week chess column, and thank Alan for all his work.

Monday, December 14, 2015

Good Things are About to Happen by Connecticut's Max Lu, Youngest US Chess Master

Good Things are About to Happen by Connecticut's Max Lu, (at left in photo) Youngest US Chess Master. Click here for article from USCF website || || Subscribe to Connecticut Chess Magazine || || Connecticut Chess Magazine (CCM) now has 4,000 members in its Facebook Group, and 3,270 like its Facebook Page. || So far the ConnecticutChess@blogspot.com has accrued 66,300+ visits. || 94 chess players automatically get CCM via email: Subscribe to Connecticut Chess Magazine by Email || 154 chess players follow Rob Roy on Twitter. On Google+ we have 102 chess players who have CCM in their circles. || We promote all chess activity in the state of Connecticut. send publicity and reports to Rob Roy at ConnecticutChess@gmail.com Connecticut Chess Magazine also has a web page || We forward Alan Lasser's Game Of The Week chess column, and thank Alan for all his work.

Saturday, December 12, 2015

What’s The Best Move ?

Grandmaster Larry Evans (photo) made a career out of asking, “what’s the best move?” Here, in the relatively simple position after White plays 17.Qe4, Black has many reasonable candidates vying for that distinction. Where might the rooks be best placed and which rook should be moved first? The queen might invade on a3, which will keep the White a pawn from attacking the Black b pawn when it advances to b5; or the queen could go 17…Qd5, because an exchange of queens on d5 will leave the White c pawn backward. If the Black knight moves away from c6, the White knight can take a powerful post on e5, but Stockfish lets that happen in several variations. Since it was game/15, I really couldn’t spend as too much time looking for the solution, and I chose 17…Rfd8 to keep the White c pawn from moving immediately. HIARCS doesn’t comment on this move or my next move, which only means that both are within the computer’s parameter of .25 pawns, but not necessarily the right move. I let the Stockfish software to examine all the candidates at 40 ply to reveal the positional truth. Instead of playing against the backward White c pawn, the best strategy is to exchange the White c pawn for the Black b pawn, leaving White with two isolated pawns to Black’s one. [Event "game/15"] [Site "New Paltz Chess Club"] [Date "2015.12.06"] [White "Rayfield Rosner"] [Black "Alan Lasser"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A11"] 1.c4 c6 2.Nc3 d5 3.cxd5 cxd5 4.d4 Nc6 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.h3 Ne4 7.Bf4 Bf5 8.e3 a6 9.Bd3 e6 10.O-O Nxc3 11.bxc3 Bxd3 12.Qxd3 Bd6 13.Bxd6 Qxd6 14.Ng5 $6 { -0.17/27 } ( 14.c4 { +0.25/25 } 14...dxc4 15.Qxc4 b5 16.Qd3 h6 17.Rfc1 O-O 18.Rc5 Rfc8 19.Rac1 Ne7 20.Ne5 Rxc5 21.Rxc5 Rc8 22.Rxc8+ Nxc8 23.Qe4 Qd5 24.Qc2 Ne7 25.Qc7 f6 26.Nd3 Kf7 ) 14...h6 15.Nf3 O-O 16.e4 $6 { -0.27/27 } ( 16.c4 { 0.00/28 } 16...Nb4 17.Qc3 dxc4 18.Qxc4 b5 19.Qb3 Nd5 20.Rfc1 Rfc8 21.Nd2 Nf6 22.Nf3 Qd5 23.Ne5 Rxc1+ 24.Rxc1 ) 16...dxe4 17.Qxe4 Rfd8 ( 17...Na5 18.c4 Nxc4 19.Qxb7 Rab8 20.Qe4 Qa3 21.Rfd1 Rb4 22.Qe2 Nb6 23.Rd3 Qa4 24.Rc3 Nd5 { -0.27 Stockfish } ) ( 17...Rfe8 18.c4 b5 19.Rfc1 Rac8 20.cxb5 axb5 21.Qd3 Ra8 22.Qxb5 Nxd4 23.Nxd4 Qxd4 24.a4 Reb8 25.Qc4 Qxc4 26.Rxc4 Ra5 { -0.14 Stockfish } ) ( 17...Rfc8 18.c4 b5 19.Rac1 bxc4 20.Rxc4 Nb4 21.Rfc1 Qf8 22.Ne5 Rxc4 23.Rxc4 Nd5 24.Rc5 Qb8 25.Nc6 Nf6 26.Qc2 Qb6 27.Ne5 Rd8 28.Nc6 Re8 29.Ne5 Rd8 { = Stockfish } ) ( 17...Rfb8 18.Rfd1 Rd8 19.c4 Rd7 20.Rab1 Rad8 21.Rd3 Rc7 22.Rb6 Qe7 23.g3 Nb4 24.Rb3 Nc6 25.Rd3 { = Stockfish } ) ( 17...Rab8 18.Rfd1 Rfd8 19.c4 Qb4 20.Rac1 Rbc8 21.Qe2 Qa4 22.Rb1 Na5 23.c5 Rc7 24.Rd2 Nc6 25.Qe3 Rdd7 { = Stockfish } ) ( 17...Rac8 18.c4 b5 19.Rac1 Rfd8 20.Rfd1 bxc4 21.Rxc4 Ne7 22.Rdc1 Rxc4 23.Rxc4 Qb6 24.a4 Qb2 { -0.12 Stockfish } ) ( 17...Rad8 18.Rab1 b5 19.a4 Rb8 20.axb5 axb5 21.Rfc1 Rfc8 22.Qe1 Qd5 23.Qe2 Na5 24.Qe5 Qd8 25.Qh5 Nc4 26.Ne5 Nxe5 27.Qxe5 b4 28.Rb3 bxc3 29.Rcxc3 Rxb3 30.Rxb3 Qc7 { -0.13 Stockfish } ) ( 17...Rae8 18.Rfd1 b5 19.d5 exd5 20.Qxd5 Qf6 21.a4 bxa4 22.Rxa4 Re6 23.Qc5 Ne5 24.Nd4 Rd8 25.Ra5 Nc6 26.Raa1 Nxd4 27.cxd4 Red6 28.Ra4 Rd5 29.Qa3 a5 { -0.03 Stockfish } ) ( 17...Qa3 18.c4 Rad8 19.Rfd1 Rd7 20.Rab1 Rfd8 21.Rd2 Qa4 22.Rc1 Na5 23.Qe2 Rc7 24.Ne5 Nc6 25.Nf3 Ne7 26.Qd3 Rdc8 27.Rdc2 Nc6 { -0.16 Stockfish } ) ( 17...Qd5 18.Qxd5 exd5 19.Rfb1 Na5 20.Rb6 Rfd8 21.Ne5 Rac8 22.Rc1 Rc7 23.Nd3 Nc4 24.Rb4 Re8 25.Nf4 Rd8 26.Nd3 { = Stockfish } ) ( 17...b5 18.a4 Rac8 19.axb5 axb5 20.Rfb1 Ne7 21.Rxb5 Rxc3 22.Rb7 Nc6 23.Rab1 Rc8 24.Ne5 Nxe5 25.dxe5 Qc6 26.Qxc6 R8xc6 27.Rd1 Rc1 { -0.10 Stockfish } ) 18.Rfd1 ( 18.Rab1 Na5 19.Rfc1 Rac8 20.c4 Nxc4 21.Qxb7 Rc7 22.Qe4 Qd7 { -0.10 Stockfish } ) 18...b5 19.Ne5 $6 { -1.10/30 } ( 19.a4 { -0.34/24 } 19...Ne7 20.Qe1 Nd5 21.Ne5 Rac8 22.axb5 axb5 23.Rdc1 Qc7 24.c4 bxc4 25.Rxc4 ) 19...Nxe5 20.dxe5 $6 { -1.46/28 } ( 20.Qxe5 { -1.17/28 } 20...Rac8 21.Qxd6 Rxd6 22.Rd3 Rdc6 23.a4 Rxc3 24.Rxc3 Rxc3 25.axb5 axb5 26.Rb1 Rc4 27.Rxb5 { Here Stockfish plays 27.d5 Rc5 28.de fe 29.Kf1 Kf7 -0.94 } 27...Rxd4 28.Rb8+ Kh7 29.Re8 g5 30.g4 Kg6 31.Kg2 Kf6 32.Rh8 Kg7 33.Re8 Rd2 34.Kg3 Rb2 35.Kf3 Rb3+ 36.Kg2 Rb1 37.Re7 Rb2 38.Rc7 e5 { 20.Qe5 Qe5 21.de Rd1 22.Rd1 Rc8 23.Rd6 a5 24.Rd3 Rc5 25.Re3 Kf8 26.f3 Rc4 -0.89 Stockfish } ) 20...Qc5 $6 { -0.54/25 } ( 20...Qxd1+ { -1.46/28 } 21.Rxd1 Rxd1+ 22.Kh2 Rad8 23.c4 R1d2 24.c5 Rc8 25.c6 Rd5 26.Qc2 Rd4 27.f3 Rc4 28.Qd2 R8xc6 29.Qd8+ Kh7 30.Qd3+ g6 31.Qd8 Rc2 32.Qf8 Rc7 33.Qd6 R2c6 34.Qf8 Rc4 35.Qa8 R7c5 36.Qxa6 { I didn't take the two rooks for the queen because I thought that the queen would gobble up my a pawn right away and perhaps the b pawn as well. } ) 21.Rxd8+ $6 { -1.34/28 } ( 21.Rd3 { -0.54/25 } 21...Rac8 22.Rg3 Qf8 23.Qf4 Rc4 24.Qxh6 Rxc3 25.Rg4 Rc4 26.Rg3 Rc2 27.a4 Rd3 ) 21...Rxd8 22.Qb7 $6 { -2.03/29 } ( 22.Rc1 { -1.42/26 } 22...Rd5 23.a4 Rxe5 24.Qa8+ Kh7 25.axb5 axb5 26.Qf3 Rf5 27.Qe2 Kg8 28.Qf1 Qc7 29.Qe2 Qc6 30.Qe1 Rc5 31.Qd2 Qe4 32.Ra1 ) 22...Qxc3 23.Qxa6 $4 { #-10/36 } ( 23.Rf1 { -2.00/29 } 23...Qa3 24.Qc7 Rd4 25.Qc8+ Kh7 26.Qc2+ Qd3 27.Rc1 Qxc2 28.Rxc2 Rc4 29.Re2 b4 30.g3 a5 31.Kg2 h5 32.h4 Kg6 33.Rd2 a4 34.Kh3 a3 ) 23...Qxa1+ 0-1 || Alan Lasser, blacklightmazes@me.com Subscribe to Connecticut Chess Magazine || || Connecticut Chess Magazine (CCM) now has 4,000 members in its Facebook Group, and 3,270 like its Facebook Page. || So far the ConnecticutChess@blogspot.com has accrued 66,300+ visits. || 94 chess players automatically get CCM via email: Subscribe to Connecticut Chess Magazine by Email || 154 chess players follow Rob Roy on Twitter. On Google+ we have 102 chess players who have CCM in their circles. || We promote all chess activity in the state of Connecticut. send publicity and reports to Rob Roy at ConnecticutChess@gmail.com Connecticut Chess Magazine also has a web page || We forward Alan Lasser's Game Of The Week chess column, and thank Alan for all his work.